Genesis: Translation and Commentary by Robert Alter

By Robert Alter

"[Here is] the Genesis for our iteration and beyond."—Robert Fagles

Genesis starts off with the making of heaven and earth and all existence, and ends with similar to a mummy—Joseph's—in a coffin. In among come the various primal tales in Western tradition: Adam and Eve's expulsion from the backyard of Eden, Cain's homicide of Abel, Noah and the Flood, the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, Abraham's binding of Isaac, the covenant of God and Abraham, Isaac's blessing of Jacob as opposed to Esau, the saga of Joseph and his brothers.

In Robert Alter's wonderful translation, those tales cohere in a strong narrative of the tortuous relatives among fathers and sons, husbands and other halves, eldest and more youthful brothers, God and his selected humans, the folks of Israel and their acquaintances. Alter's translation honors the meanings and literary thoughts of the traditional Hebrew and conveys them in fluent English prose. It recovers a Genesis with the continuity of subject and motif of a totally conceived and entirely discovered ebook. His insightful, absolutely trained statement illuminates the booklet in all its dimensions.

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The children of this union were three daughters, Iphigenia (also called Iphianassa), Electra (or Laodice), and Chrysothemis; and one son, Orestes. In the Iliad Agamemnon is treated by the other Greek rulers as a high king to whom they owe allegiance and a feudal duty of military service. He took a hundred ships to Troy, the largest single contingent. He carried an ivory sceptre made by Hephaestus for Zeus, who gave it to Hermes, who in turn gave it to Agamemnon’s grandfather Pelops. When Helen was being courted by all the eligible kings of Greece, Agamemnon persuaded her father Tyndareos to give her in marriage to his brother Menelaus.

He was the strongest Argonaut next to Heracles, and was paired with him on the rowing-bench. After the return of Argo, he was killed by the boar in the Calydonian boar-hunt, because of his foolhardy courage, or because he had claimed to be as good a hunter as Artemis. His son was Agapenor. 2. Son of Poseidon and Astydamia, daughter of Phoenix; he was king of the Leleges in Samos. On the voyage of the Argo he took over the helm when Tiphys died. Before he sailed with the Argo he planted a vineyard, of which it was prophesied by one of his servants that he would not live to taste its wine.

Aesa Fate, or one of the Fates. Who’s who in classical mythology 22 Aesacus Son of King Priam and the nymph Alexirrhoe, daughter of the River Granicus. Brought up in the country near Mount Ida, Aesacus fell in love with the nymph Hesperia. Seeing her one day drying her hair by the River Cebren, of which river her father was the god, Aesacus pursued her. Fleeing, she was bitten on the foot by a snake and died. Mortified by guilt, Aesacus leapt into the sea to drown himself. But Tethys had pity on him and turned him into a diver bird, which dashes itself constantly into the waves from a great height.

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