National Geographic Essential Visual History of World by National Geographic

By National Geographic

Complementing our tremendously profitable choices at the bible and heritage, National Geographic crucial visible heritage of global Mythology encompasses myths and production tales from worldwide. It offers a palm-size evaluate of culture-defining myths, from historical Egyptian deities to the Vedic gods of India...from Maya, Inca, and Aztec legends to the Dream time of the Aborigines. this can be a must-have source for someone who desires to be aware of extra in regards to the tales that experience formed societies for millennia.

The cutting edge structure with timelines, sidebars, and self-contained interactive spreads provides readers various access issues counting on their curiosity point. The editors of the fundamental sequence have greater this book’s source price via together with such components as numbered photo references that fit every one picture with its old period as mentioned within the textual content, and pass references to comparable subject matters on the backside of the web page. comfortably sized but huge in scope, it displays nationwide Geographic’s authority and credibility within the class of global tradition and peoples.

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Extra info for National Geographic Essential Visual History of World Mythology

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It was after this dream, that Enkidu lost all hope of recovering when he fell ill, and died. Eastern mythology. It was the rea l m of the un derworld gods, Nergal and Ereshkigal, and of various demons and spirits. The fate of the dead i n the underworld was depen dent u pon their Genie performing a protec­ earthly l ife. After his death, tive magical gesture Enkidu reported to his friend Gi lgamesh that someone who had no c h i l d ren wou l d, as a result, starve in the afterl ife, The more sons one had, the more one would have to eat a n d drink.

There were many different symbols for Nan na; for exa mple, a boat or the horns of a bull for h i m as a crescent moon, o r a ripe piece of fruit resem­ bling the full moon. Nanna City God of Ur Nanna was the god of the city of U r. C. was already a thriving city. The earliest known high priestesses performed their duties there. c.. Nanna maintained a high place among the gods for governing the city perfectly. State enter­ prises registered each arrival and exit from the city, down to the last cattle carcass.

It was after this dream, that Enkidu lost all hope of recovering when he fell ill, and died. Eastern mythology. It was the rea l m of the un derworld gods, Nergal and Ereshkigal, and of various demons and spirits. The fate of the dead i n the underworld was depen dent u pon their Genie performing a protec­ earthly l ife. After his death, tive magical gesture Enkidu reported to his friend Gi lgamesh that someone who had no c h i l d ren wou l d, as a result, starve in the afterl ife, The more sons one had, the more one would have to eat a n d drink.

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